First, it’s key to understand younger generations. Thirty-five percent of active duty millennials surveyed have student loan debt, and about a third have mortgages. This brings the total to 182,000 troops per year. ... 60 percent of … There is a subset of Millennials that you, as leaders, have to be aware of. This is the continuation of a trend observed in 2014. Imagine having to recruit more than 60,000 people a year, from diverse backgrounds, for positions that may require moving far from family, letting go of a lot of civilian comforts, and perhaps even seeing combat. When they serve in the military, however, millennials are speaking not just for themselves, but also for those who report to them. They experienced some traumatic events in their formative years: 9/11, the housing bubble and stock market collapse. Yet even since the end of the draft in 1973, subsequent generations have been less and less likely to serve in the military. A Last Resort. The 29 percent of 17- to 24-year-olds who are qualified become prime targets for all recruiting: military, college and jobs. According to recently released data from the Pentagon, only 10 million of the 34 million young Americans between the ages of 18 and 24 are eligible to serve in the military. As Ms. Rosemary Williams, DASD for Military Community & Family Policy, briefed at the July 2014 Financial Roundtable meeting, military millennials are also more likely than other millennials to live away from urban areas and, not surprisingly, own cars and carry auto loans. Being fit means they’re one step closer mentally. People lump all Millennials into one bucket and make assumptions of who they are. As the Washington Post reports, millennials “want jobs that affect social change, and they give what they can. That compares to 44 percent of Asian American, 42 percent of African American and 37 percent of Latino millennials. As of 2015, 72% of active duty personnel were millennials. The U.S. military conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan after Sept. 11, 2001, have resulted in a long, drawn-out war, and millennials are far less likely to serve than previous generations. They are the next generation: the Network Generation. At that time, the years following the Vietnam War, nearly three-fourths of lawmakers had served in the military. Perhaps few organizations face a more difficult challenge than the U.S. Army. Written by Lila Quintiliani | August 12, 2019. Finally, the military can be an option for people who have no other options left. , in which officials ask young people ages 16 to 21 a basic question: "How likely is it that you will be serving in the military in the next few years?" Life in the military isn’t easy, but if you serve long enough the financial rewards, at least, are great. The percentage of officers who are women has steadily grown since the 1970s. 71 percent of young Americans between 17 and 24 are ineligible to serve in the military—that is 24 million of the 34 million people of that age group. That is to say, they represent the future of the U.S. military. This is flat-out wrong. This is the continuation of a trend observed in 2014. “[One] of their most positive aspects is that their level of bias — interracial, … According to recently released data from the Pentagon, only 10 million of the 34 million young Americans between the ages of 18 and 24 are eligible to serve in the military. ations—baby boomers, Generation X, millennials, and Generation Z—who will serve either as enlisted soldiers, officers, or cadets in 2025. A new survey shows how Millennials' views on military intervention are both similar and different to generations that have come before. While the military should not change its core character or values to accommodate Millennials, it should recognize their views of the world differ from those of past generations. This is flat-out wrong. If they’ve worked to earn their spot on the team, they won’t take it for granted. (Editor’s note: I love the authors of this piece, but they clearly don’t have kids. The research revealed that military millennials are much more likely to be married than their non-military peers. Americans, specifically millennials, have a military exclusivity problem. If they are officers or senior enlisted men or women, this may mean hundreds of people. To make those numbers, 1.82% of the total 18-24-year-old American population that can enlist must do so. 7 of the Greatest Songs Every Veteran Knows Here are 10 characteristics of military millennials that leaders need to understand as they engage and lead them: They are mostly in the rank window of E5-E6 and O2-O3. Females comprise 16.9% of the “Total” Army. It’s not uncommon for potential recruits to get fit before they even step in a recruiter’s office. The Pentagon doesn’t sweat the loss of young adults who aren’t eligible or have no interest, however, because of the many able troops willing to raise their right hand and pick up the slack. Three in four military millennial respondents indicated they were offered financial education, and of those, almost half participated in financial education—a financial education rate that is much higher than the national average. Appears in Winter 2016. Millennials (defined as those born between 1981-1996) are an interesting generation. A 2012 study found that three-quarters of young people surveyed gave to a charity in 2011, and 63 percent volunteered for a cause.” It bears remembering that this is an all-volunteer force. They joined the military after 9/11 and see the world through a lens that includes terrorism. Military service isn’t for everyone. When Attiyya first got married, she and her Marine husband had just graduated from college and were focused on paying off student loan debt. Millennials (born between 1981 and 1996) have experienced a lot in a short period. For Generation X, or those born in 1965 through 1984, military participation ranges from 5 to 7 percent, making millennials’ lower service rates—approximately 3 percent—not an anomaly, but part of the trend that began with the creation of the all-volunteer force. ... 60 percent of … Not surprisingly, married military millennials with dependents reported more financial stress than those without. This article originally appeared on We Are The Mighty, 5 Reasons Why Troops Stick Together After the Military “[One] of their most positive aspects is that their level of bias — interracial, … We started by calculating the percent of each cabinet level agency that was between 20 and 34 years old and found that on average, millennials made up 17.75 percent of agency employees. Here are some thoughts: Different experiences can lead to different behaviors. You've got “elder” millennials like myself (‘84) who grew up playing outside with their brothers and generally getting along very well without technology. Written by Stephen Ross, America Saves Program Coordinator | November 22, 2019. The poll found that support for Trump among the 1,018 active duty troops surveyed had fallen to 38 percent in 2020 from 46 percent ... 113 served in the military … They carry student loan and medical debt burdens that previous generations did not often have to bear. The strength of the U.S. military depends on a constant flow of qualified volunteers. Millennial respondents are nine percent more satisfied with their financial situation than the generation Xers that preceded them. By middle school, kids should have a good understanding of how money works as well as the importance of saving. While millennials make up about 30 percent of the general population in the U.S., they constitute nearly three quarters of the service men and women in the military. U.S. Military Academy As of September 2016, there were 4,469 cadets enrolled in the U.S. Military Academy (20% females and 33% racial/ethnic minorities). This time we want to highlight a different kind of story. In 2016, 7% of U.S. adults were … This includes those who would serve from Generation Z (those with a date of birth between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2019). In November of 2015, shortly after the Paris attacks, a poll from the Harvard Institute of Politics revealed that 60 percent of millennials were in favour of the use of military force in Iraq and Syria to combat ISIL, yet only 15 percent were willing to serve in the military. ations—baby boomers, Generation X, millennials, and Generation Z—who will serve either as enlisted soldiers, officers, or cadets in 2025. The Harvard poll found that 60 percent support the war on ISIS. This is the continuation of a trend observed in 2014. (Photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Mark Barney). A Last Resort. Written by Guest Blogger | March 13, 2014, Start an emergency fund by saving $10/week or $40/month to save $500 by the end of the year http://ow.ly/rswS2. Consumer Federation of America Attn: Military Saves Campaign 1620 Eye Street NW, Suite 200 Washington, DC 20006 info@militarysaves.org T: (202) 387-6121 F: (202) 265-7989, Military Millennials: What the Research Reveals. They are also responsible for … But some employers must attract and manage a much broader swath of millennials. In addition, forty-one percent of the military millennial respondents have high levels of financial literacy, again, a rate significantly higher than the national average, which is 24 percent. Millennials Are the Military’s Future Millennials are on track to make up nearly fifty percent of the workforce by 2020. Many potential recruits are passionate about enlisting but can’t due to some limitation while others who would make perfect applicants have no interest. Life in the military isn’t easy, but if you serve long enough the financial rewards, at least, are great. Those organizations best positioned to meet their needs will understand the different challenges and opportunities Millennials face and adjust to new ways of working with them. At that time, the years following the Vietnam War, nearly three-fourths of lawmakers had served in the military. (Note: the military refers to GenZ as NetGens) As of 2015, 72% of active duty personnel were millennials. They had both attended private schools and had sizeable loans. Many millennials could have retired with 20 years in service last year. People look at prototypes of … Millennials make up nearly a quarter of the total U.S. population, 30 percent of the voting age population, and almost two-fifths of the working age population. In 2015 a Harvard poll found that Millennials “Support Sending Ground Troops to Combat ISIS but Less that 20% are Inclined to Serve” but no one bothered to focus on the fact that Harvard lopped off six years of the populous when doing the poll or what those percentages meant when applied to a Millennial population of 68.39 million. When the draft ended in 1973, women represented just 2 percent of the enlisted forces and 8 percent of the officer corps. According to recently released data from the Pentagon, only 10 million of the 34 million young Americans between the ages of 18 and 24 are eligible to serve in the military. They grew up in a country characterized by more racial diversity, a narrower gender gap in educational attainment, large increases in the cost of higher education and the defining events of September 11, 2001. See their good qualities. (Photo by Scott Sturkol). The 29 percent of 17- to 24-year-olds who are qualified become prime targets for all recruiting: military, college and jobs. There are many reasons for disqualifying potential recruits. For example, in 1975, 5% of commissioned officers were women, and, by 2017, that share had risen to 18%. Understanding the financial capability of millennials in the military is an important step toward understanding the financial capability of the military in general. I never hear military members carp about the 99.5 percent of the population that does not serve in the military. They joined the military after 9/11 and see the world through a lens that includes terrorism. Can we draw general conclusions about military millennials from this research? For Generation X, or those born in 1965 through 1984, military participation ranges from 5 to 7 percent, making millennials’ lower service rates—approximately 3 percent—not an anomaly, but part of the trend that began with the creation of the all-volunteer force. The influential Harvard poll found that 16 percent of the 18-29 age group had joined the military. Use of U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) visual information does not imply or constitute DoD endorsement. The military relies on a constant flow of new recruits to fill in the gaps left by troops who left the service that year. See their good qualities. Plenty … However, it’s Gen Z that now makes up much of the military recruiting pool … Finally, the military can be an option for people who have no other options left. Just 19 percent of U.S. millennials agreed with the statement that “military takeover is not legitimate in a democracy.” Among older citizens, the total was a still-surprising 43 percent. That may be about managing their financial expectations. The chart shows both the numbers and percentages for each category. The first year of their marriage, says Attiyya, was a balancing act between paying down debt and saving for the future. We also included part time and temporary employees because many millennials serve in short term internships or contract positions. To properly sustain the ranks, recruiters need to find the U.S. Army 80,000 new troops, the Marine Corps needs 38,000, the Air Force needs 33,000, and the Navy needs 31,000 annually. Not all of this is due to the recalcitrance of millennials of course. Millennials are the largest cohort in the U.S. workplace today. Millennials (defined as those born between 1981-1996) are an interesting generation.